The Reagan I Knew

The Reagan I Knew
Authors
Buckley-Jr., William F.
Publisher
Basic Books (AZ)
Tags
reagan , buckley , politics , 1925-2008 , ronald , william f. (william frank) , presidents , biography , history
ISBN
9780465009268
Date
2008-11-01T00:00:00+00:00
Size
0.54 MB
Lang
en
Downloaded: 19 times

Includes bibliographical references and index;The late William F. Buckley Jr. offers a reminiscence of thirty years of friendship with the man who brought the American conservative movement out of the political wilderness and into the White House. Ronald Reagan and Buckley were political allies and close friends throughout Reagan's political career. They went on vacations together and shared inside jokes. Yet for all the words that have been written about him, Ronald Reagan remains an enigma. His former speechwriter Peggy Noonan called him "paradox all the way down," and even his son Ron Reagan despaired of ever truly knowing him. But Reagan was not an enigma to William F. Buckley Jr. They understood and taught each other for decades, and together they changed history. This book presents an American political giant as seen by another giant, who knew him perhaps better than anyone else--the most revealing portrait of Ronald Reagan the world is likely to have.--From publisher description;First meeting -- Visiting the Reagans in California -- Is it possible to be a good governor? -- Capote and the Reagans -- Is Reagan running? -- Nixon to China -- Reagan vs. Ford -- Schweiker for Veep? -- Thanksgiving at the Buckleys' -- "Firing line" and the Panama Canal -- "Firing line": the debate -- Reagan anticipates his presidency -- "National Review's" 25th -- New begnnings -- Stockman and the budget -- A self-interrogation on the size of government -- "National Review's" 30th -- On nuclear strategy in Honolulu -- Final meeting -- Selected columns

The late William F. Buckley Jr. offers a reminiscence of thirty years of friendship with the man who brought the American conservative movement out of the political wilderness and into the White House. Ronald Reagan and Buckley were political allies and close friends throughout Reagan's political career. They went on vacations together and shared inside jokes. Yet for all the words that have been written about him, Ronald Reagan remains an enigma. His former speechwriter Peggy Noonan called him "paradox all the way down," and even his son Ron Reagan despaired of ever truly knowing him. But Reagan was not an enigma to William F. Buckley Jr. They understood and taught each other for decades, and together they changed history. This book presents an American political giant as seen by another giant, who knew him perhaps better than anyone else--the most revealing portrait of Ronald Reagan the world is likely to have.--From publisher description

In *The Regan I Knew* , the late William F. Buckley Jr. offers a reminiscence of thirty years of friendship with the man who brought the American conservative movement out of the political wilderness and into the White House. Ronald Reagan and Buckley were political allies and close friends throughout Reagan’s political career. They went on vacations together and shared inside jokes. When Reagan was elected president, Buckley wrote him to say that Reagan should not offer him any position in the new administration; Reagan wrote back saying he had hoped to appoint Buckley U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan (then under Soviet occupation). For the rest of his term, Reagan called Buckley “Mr. Ambassador.” On the day the Soviets withdrew, he wrote Buckley to congratulate him for single-handedly driving out the Red Army “without ever leaving Kabul.”Yet for all the words that have been written about him, Ronald Reagan remains an enigma. His former speechwriter Peggy Noonan called him “paradox all the way down,” and even his son Ron Reagan despaired of ever truly knowing him. But Reagan was not an enigma to William F. Buckley Jr. They understood and taught each other for decades, and together they changed history.

This book presents an American political giant as seen by another giant, who knew him perhaps better than anyone else. It is the most revealing portrait of Ronald Reagan the world is likely to have.